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Letters

Brea Reese Watercolor Inks – Water Brush Review

Brea Reese mixed media line is new and making a big splash on the scene. Their line includes:
  • pure pigment acrylic paints
  • paint writer pens
  • water brushes
  • watercolor inks
  • glitter inks
  • texture mediums
  • alcohol markers
  • mixed media tools
  • fineliner pens
  • metallic pens
  • dual tip water-based markers
That's a pretty big variety of art supplies! Today, I am going to be focusing on the watercolor inks, and water brushes. As far as retailers go, you can purchase Brea Reese products from Hobby Lobby, and Amazon.com.
Acrylic

Digitizing Artwork – Photoshop

There is no substitute for the feel of creating analog art; that is, art with traditional materials by hand. What do you do in a digital world? How do you get reproductions without turning yourself into a machine painting daisies forever? How do you get that perfect Etsy listing image? I will answer all these questions and more with this digitizing artwork series.

Why Photoshop?

Today we are going to talk about using Photoshop to digitize our analog artwork.  There are other options out there, but Photoshop has long since been the industry standard for image manipulation. Adobe Creative Cloud offers Photoshop as part of a subscription service.  There are some pluses and minuses to the subscription model. With a single purchase you had to drop a huge chunk of change to get the software, but you owned it forever. Upgrading to get new, and innovative, features was also costly.  With the subscription model you pay a lower up front cost, and can always have the newest features. You certainly can do all of the steps included in this guide with an older version of Photoshop. As long as you have layer masks and adjustment layers, you are all set.
Watercolor

Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor – Part 4 Tools and Setup

You finally made it to the end of the supplies and setup! This is the final installment discussing all the tools you need to get started with watercolor. This segment will talk about the extra items you need and some you may want, but aren't required.

Water

You will need a receptacle to hold water to wet your brushes and your paint. I like to use one jar for clean water, and one jar for dirty water. There are many methods out there. None are wrong, so try things out and see what works for you.  Some use just one container. Some use two, but differentiate them as warm and cool colors.  I sometimes pull a third jar out when I'm working with ink and watercolor. Inky water can get very dirty and murky really fast.

Paint

Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor – Part 2 The Brushes

Installment 2 of the Beginner's Guide to Watercolor series is all about brushes. Today we are talking about the good, the bad, and the super ugly!

If you missed a part, or want to review something else, here is the article list.

Straight away I will tell you what I consider to be a "good" brush.
  1. It must not shed. I do not want to be picking stray hairs out of my paint. I already have to battle the cat and dog hair at home.
  2. It must not have paint on the handle flaking off onto my hands and onto my painting. Again, gross.
  3. It must do what it was designed to do! If it's a mop brush, it should hold lots of paint and water and let go of that paint and water when applied to the paper.
  4. Round brushes must have a nice point and hold that shape. This is going to be personal as to how firm you like your brushes to be, and how much "snap back," or elasticity you like.
  5. The ferrule can't be coming off the handle.
  6. I prefer it to be labeled for size.  This just helps me when I'm painting so I know what one I want to reach for again to get the same stroke. Sizes vary between brands, but knowing which size and brand you used helps to recreate the strokes you want.