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5 Quick and Easy Watercolor Backgrounds

In this stage of the Beginner's Guide to Watercolor we will be going over some basic techniques by making easy watercolor backgrounds useful for card making, lettering, and more.

Whether you are a watercolor beginner or an old pro, these backgrounds are a great way to practice technique.  These backgrounds utilize several basic watercolor techniques.

So gather your supplies and let’s get painting! If you have questions on basic supplies and setting up, check out the first four parts of the Beginner's Guide to Watercolor series on on supplies.
Watercolor

Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor – Part 4 Tools and Setup

You finally made it to the end of the supplies and setup! This is the final installment discussing all the tools you need to get started with watercolor. This segment will talk about the extra items you need and some you may want, but aren't required.

Water

You will need a receptacle to hold water to wet your brushes and your paint. I like to use one jar for clean water, and one jar for dirty water. There are many methods out there. None are wrong, so try things out and see what works for you.  Some use just one container. Some use two, but differentiate them as warm and cool colors.  I sometimes pull a third jar out when I'm working with ink and watercolor. Inky water can get very dirty and murky really fast.

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Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor – Part 2 The Brushes

Installment 2 of the Beginner's Guide to Watercolor series is all about brushes. Today we are talking about the good, the bad, and the super ugly!

If you missed a part, or want to review something else, here is the article list.

Straight away I will tell you what I consider to be a "good" brush.
  1. It must not shed. I do not want to be picking stray hairs out of my paint. I already have to battle the cat and dog hair at home.
  2. It must not have paint on the handle flaking off onto my hands and onto my painting. Again, gross.
  3. It must do what it was designed to do! If it's a mop brush, it should hold lots of paint and water and let go of that paint and water when applied to the paper.
  4. Round brushes must have a nice point and hold that shape. This is going to be personal as to how firm you like your brushes to be, and how much "snap back," or elasticity you like.
  5. The ferrule can't be coming off the handle.
  6. I prefer it to be labeled for size.  This just helps me when I'm painting so I know what one I want to reach for again to get the same stroke. Sizes vary between brands, but knowing which size and brand you used helps to recreate the strokes you want.