There is no substitute for the feel of creating analog art; that is, art with traditional materials by hand. What do you do in a digital world? How do you get reproductions without turning yourself into a machine painting daisies forever? How do you get that perfect Etsy listing image? I will answer all these questions and more with this digitizing artwork series.

Why Pixelmator

Today we are going to talk about Pixelmator. I saw one of my #instafriends needing help with digitizing her artwork. (Craftysuelau wave!) She is an amazing artist! She does these beautiful loose watercolor florals that I aspire to one day. Check our her instagram @craftysuelau. I couldn’t accept a world where she couldn’t share that art in the way she wanted.¬†With my background in graphic design, I felt I could give back to her for all the wonderful tips and tutorials she has shared with everyone.

My immediate instinct was to teach her Photoshop, but we can’t all afford this program, nor do we all need it. I found out she uses a Mac and remembered Pixelmator. It is a one time purchase at a very affordable rate. In the US this is currently running $29.99. Compare that to Adobe software. If you are a Mac user, this just makes sense.

I downloaded the trial and ran through the steps I would with Photoshop. I was able to do nearly identical steps. In fact, selecting the white background was almost easier in Pixelmator. I set to work typing up this tutorial for her. She said it was very easy to follow and she was able to accomplish the task she set out to do. I have since made a few revisions and I want to share that tutorial with you.

Digitizing Artwork with Pixelmator

Digitizing your artwork with Pixelmator can be an affordable option to get awesome results.

Yes it’s free!

As this is lengthy, I have prepared it as a PDF file “Digitizing Art in Pixelmator” for you to download. If you find this helpful, please feel free to share the link to this page with your friends and followers. Please do not redistribute this file.

Click HERE to download the guide

What about my program?

I will be writing similar tutorials for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, ¬†Illustrator, and maybe even GIMP. Do you have another software you think might work? Comment below and I’ll check it out. Please feel free to ask questions if you find yourself stuck. This guide may be revised based on feedback I receive.

Want to get started with watercolor?

Check out my Beginner’s Guide to Watercolor series to get all the info on supplies and basics to get you started!

Written by Tanya

    2 Comments

  1. Valerie Harris May 24, 2017 at 3:12 pm Reply

    Have you used inkscape at all? It’s supposed to be the free alternative to illustrator. After using the free trial of illustrator and then using inkscape it’s not quite as intuitive, but it could be that I have a knowledge of photoshop so Adobe products are more comfortable to me.

    • Tanya May 24, 2017 at 5:18 pm Reply

      I haven’t used Inkscape yet. I am familiar with it. I have been using Illustrator for years, so I haven’t ventured into Inkscape. I plan to work through it when I get to the vector portion of my digitizing series as an option. I feel similar about GIMP. It’s a free option for Photoshop. It works, but it’s cumbersome and not intuitive at all. Thanks for your insight!

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